Look up! See Mercury!

Look up! See Mercury!

February 11, 2006 8:00 PM - 8:00 AM

CLUB DOME: ART AND TECHNOLOGY AT THE PLANETARIUM presents Look up! See Mercury! featuring Jonathan Lee Marcus and Stephan Moore
DomeWorks and the Children's Museum of Science and Technology have partnered to bring Club Dome, a series of experimental immersive visual and sound art works to the Museum's Planetarium, the first programming of this sort to be presented in the Capital region. The intimacy of the Planetarium dome invites the Club Dome experience from either chairs or on cushions, fully reclined under the dome. Special blankies and personal pillows allowed. When: all performances at 8 PM Where: the Children's Museum of Science and Technology, 250 Jordan Road, Troy, NY (in the Rensselaer Technology Park) Stephan Moore is a composer, audio artist, and sound designer based in Brooklyn. His creative work centers around the collection and use of real-world sound, the creation and perception of sonic environments, and technological manifestations of improvisation and interactivity. Recent performances and installation artworks make use of a large multi-channel array of his hand-built hemispherical speakers. He performs regularly as half of the electronic duo Evidence, and with a variety of musicians, live-video artists, and dancers. He has created custom music software for a number of composers and artists, and has taught courses in sound art and electronic music at Maryland Institute College of Art, Peabody Conservatory, Massachusetts College of Art, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Simon's Rock College of Bard. He is currently the Sound Supervisor of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Jonathan Lee Marcus is an artist, teacher, and programmer based in Troy, New York. His work has focused on video instrumentalism (improvisational video performance) as well as interactive installation pieces that encourage participants to explore a separation of time from space. His work has been performed and exhibited at a variety of places internationally. He is also an active participant and volunteer in the Burning Man community. Art in the Planetarium The current trend of digitally refitting planetarium domes world-wide to fulldome, single channel projection systems has opened a new world of possibilities for educational and artistic programming, dramatically lowering the cost both of production and delivery. Immersive sound systems are part of the commercial, video gaming, and home theater environments, and a staple of sound art in new media experimentation on the art and technology scene. The visual equivalent—the fulldome cinema paradigm—abandons flat rectangular projection screens to immerse the viewer using the hemispherical surface of a dome. Creating and presenting new types of content for planetarium domes, beyond the traditional astronomy-related programs and laser light shows is a new challenge and opportunity. DomeWorks is an arts collaborative based in the Capital region creating works for domed spaces and the hardware and software tools and equipment for future technological and aesthetic experimentation in wraparound realities. Marshall McLuhan claimed that each of our new technologies rearranges the ratio of our senses to produce new perceptual experience. DomeWorks is a living laboratory for such experimentation in extended perception of sound and sight, exploring the borders of audibility and visibility through spatialization of sound, and through imaging that reaches beyond the borders of peripheral vision. DomeWorks thanks the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) for its generous support. DomeWorks is a project of Deep Listening Institute, Ltd.
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