Lecture & Exhibit by Jim Campbell

Lecture & Exhibit by Jim Campbell

November 2, 2005 7:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Ambiguous Icons -- Lecture and Exhibit by Jim Campbell Opening Reception: Wed., November 2, 7 PM, West Hall, Gallery 111 Lecture to follow in West Hall Auditorium, 7:30 PM Admission: Free Campbell creates illuminated artworks with custom electronics on themes of time, memory, and perception. On exhibit will be four of Campbell’s works -- Ambiguous Icons explore the relationship between information and meaning, in the context of reduced or compressed levels of information. Co-presented with the Center for Photography in Woodstock. Exhibit closes November 30. For directions to the RPI campus please access the college website at www.rpi.edu and click on “Visit RPI”. For more information on iEAR Presents! call (518) 276-4829. iEAR presents! is a series of public performances, exhibitions and lectures featuring pioneering and emerging artists who explore the boundaries of electronic art. Curated by the Arts Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, iEAR Presents! offers a unique local forum for some of today's most world-renowned electronic media artists. This event is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information, please call (518) 276-4829. Jim Campbell - Biography Jim Campbell was born in Chicago in 1956 and lives in San Francisco. He received degrees in Mathematics and Engineering from MIT in 1978. He transitioned from filmmaking to interactive video installations in the mid 1980s. His custom electronic sculptures and installations have made him a leading figure in the use of computer technology as an art form. Excerpt from the essay "Jim Campbell: Working in the Open Sphere" by Marilyn A. Zeitlin from the catalog Jim Campbell: Transforming Time, Electronic Works 1990-99, published by Arizona State University Art Museum: By joining physics and metaphysics in a mutual safari into epistemology from assorted scientific, artistic, and spiritual positions, while remaining acutely aware of the limitations to our ability to know, Campbell's work reinforces the skepticism characteristic of the body of theoretical writing loosely collected under the rubric "postmodern." The perennial human desire to know is paired with a need to know how we know. Campbell's genius, if I may use such a word, is in his skill at bringing us back to that state of relative innocence in which we again ask not only what reality might be but how we can know it when we sense it... Campbell combines more traditional media, such as video, with his own inventions. He is expanding video in particular as a medium, using it to posit questions about time, memory, and perceived reality in the vocabu- lary of the electronic age or perhaps, more accurately, the post-electronic age. He welcomes viewer for whom the silent, static work of art is often no longer engaging, employing media of communication familiar to people who grew up not only on television, but on Nintendo and the Internet. He is on the forefront of interactive work. Yet Campbell does not limit his viewership to the children of cyberspace. His work has a timeless quality in its ideas, its conceptual concision, and its apparent simplicity. Jim Campbell's website: www.jimcampbell.tv/
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