Margaret Mead Traveling Film & Video Festival

Margaret Mead Traveling Film & Video Festival

February 1, 2006 7:00 PM - 7:00 AM


January 25 & 26 - February 1 & 2 – February 8 & 9 The American Museum of Natural History’s Margaret Mead Traveling Film and Video Festival Co-sponsored by The Sanctuary for Independent Media Location: The Sanctuary (www.thesanctuaryforindependentmedia.org) 3361 Sixth Ave., Troy, NY (at 101st Street where Sixth Ave. turns into Fifth) Time: 7:00 PM Admission: By Donation
Founded in 1977, The Margaret Mead Traveling Film and Video Festival is the longest-running showcase for international documentaries, encompassing a broad spectrum of work, from indigenous community media to experimental nonfiction.
Video & Film Schedule: Wednesday, February 1 at 7:00 PM with Kathy Brew, Co-Director of The American Museum of Natural History’s Margaret Mead Traveling Film Festival Ryan (Canada) This award-winning film is an animated tribute to Canadian animator Ryan Larkin. Thirty years ago, at the National Film Board of Canada, Ryan produced some of the most influential animated films of his time. But today, Ryan lives on welfare and panhandles for spare change in downtown Montreal. We hear the voice of Ryan himself, along with others who have known him, as well as see excerpts from his films. How could such an artistic genius end up in this situation? Nalini by Day, Nancy by Night Sonali Gulati. 2005. 26 min. This experimental documentary looks at the outsourcing of American jobs to India. Told from the perspective of an Indian immigrant living in the U.S., the film journeys into India's call centers where telemarketer's acquire American names and accents to service the telephone-support industry of the U.S. The film incorporates animation, live action, and archival footage to explore the complexities of globalization, capitalism, and identity. Phantom Limb Jay Rosenblatt. 2005. 28 min. (U.S.) Experimental filmmaker Jay Rosenblatt uses the phenomenon of “phantom limb syndrome” as a metaphor to explore his feelings about the death of his younger brother 40 years ago. The film transposes reflections of grief and loss into chapters that refer to various stages of mourning. Blending family photos with archival footage and interviews, the film merges the personal with the universal, and the emotional with the psychological, underscoring the impermanence that we all face. Thursday, February 2 at 7:00 PM Bride Kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan Petr Lom. 2004. 51 min. (Kyrgyzstan) Arranged marriages are a traditional custom in many societies. In rural Kyrgyzstan, bride kidnapping is a common practice that continues despite its illegal status. This film offers unprecedented access to four women’s stories, documenting their abductions in harrowing detail—from their tearful protests to their physical restraint, to the tense negotiations between the respective families. While some of the marriages conclude happily or peacefully, others do not, and this sensitively crafted film portrays complicated notions about the nature of love and marriage. Children of the Decree Florin Iepan. 2004. 52 min. (Romania) By the mid-60s, the feminist movement in the West was advancing women’s reproductive rights, but in Romania under the Ceausescu regime, women’s reproductive rights were being managed by the state. Decree 770 criminalized contraception and abortion for women under the age of 40 unless they were already raising at least four children. This film interweaves state propaganda, documentary, and feature films with the candid testimony of public figures, gynecologists, and back-street abortionists to highlight the devastating consequences for women and their families. Wednesday, February 8 at 7:00 PM with filmmakers Jeffrey Togman and Pierre Defendini Home Jeffrey M. Togman. 2005. 85 min. (U.S.) Since the shortage of affordable housing ranks as one of New York City’s largest and most complex issues, this story-driven documentary arrives at the right moment. Sheree Farmer, a single mother of six living in a struggling neighborhood in Newark, faces the challenges of buying her first home with the help of a financial planner turned social worker. Her story, as she attempts to achieve the American dream, is an intimate and touching commentary on race, class, and the future of America’s cities. Thursday, February 9 at 7:00 PM Land Mines: A Love Story Dennis O’Rourke. 2004. 73 min. (Afghanistan) From the maker of Mead Festival favorites -- Cannibal Tours and Cunnamulla -- comes a film about Afghanistan, land mines, survival, and love. It chronicles the love story of Habiba and Shah, two land-mine victims living together in Kabul and struggling to make ends meet. Part observational film and part essay, Land Mines is an anti-war film set in a country whose name has become synonymous with conflict.
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